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Twitter Demanded Superpowers After Anti-Vaxxer’s “Magnetize” Theory Went Viral

(image via Twitter/GeorgeHahn)


Twitter went wild yesterday when video of an anti-vaxxer physician went viral after she claimed COVID-19 vaccines ‘magnetize’ people.

Dr. Sherri Tenpenny, Doctor of Osteopathy, testified on Tuesday at an Ohio state House Health committee hearing in favor of a bill that would prohibit Ohio schools or businesses from requiring vaccines.

“I’m sure you’ve seen the pictures all over the internet of people who have had these shots and now they’re magnetized,” Tenpenny told the Ohio House Health Committee. “They can put a key on their forehead. It sticks. They can put spoons and forks all over them and they can stick, because now we think that there’s a metal piece to that.”

She added that there are “people” who believe the vaccines have an “interface – yet to be defined” with 5G cell phone towers before quickly adding, “not proven yet but…”

So, first of all, there’s no metal in COVID vaccines. Second, the good doctor offers no ideas as to HOW mRNA interfaces with a cell phone tower.

Does she think it requires an app like Scruff or something…?

To give you an idea of how ‘accurate’ her claims are, Tenpenny tried to bolster her bona fides by saying she’s spent up to 10,000 hours studying vaccines since the pandemic began.

The only problem with that is there have only been something like 11,000 hours since the beginning of the pandemic in the U.S. So, she would have been “studying” vaccines 22 hours a day, every day, since March 2020.

By the way, experts have already debunked the hilarious “COVID-19 contains magnets” myth:

@drgigiosler

Debunking the “COVID19 vaccine contains a magnet” myth. Was vaccinated in December 2020 & January 2021.

♬ original sound – Dr Gigi Osler

But this woman, who followed Tenpenny, really put the nail in it when she tried to ‘prove’ the magnetic theory – #epicfail:

In any case, Twitter thought Tenpenny’s thoughts were about nine pennies short of having any good sense.

After ‘Magneto’ began trending on Twitter, we took a look to see what folks thought of the theory:


Many people got excited thinking the Marvel villain ‘Magneto’ was trending because the new series ‘Loki’ debuted on the same day. Folks were pretty bummed that wasn’t the case.

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