More Than 1,000 LGBTQ Elected Officials Will Be Serving In The U.S.

Following the events of Tuesday night’s elections across the country, the United States appears to have elected more than 1,000 concurrently serving LGBTQ officials for the first time in history.

There were at least 237 lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer candidates were on the ballot this year. That represents an 18.5% increase over the last off-year election, in 2019, according to the Victory Fund.

According to the Victory Fund:

• Six out LGBTQ candidates won their races for the New York City Council, which means the number of out representatives on the 51-person council increased from four to six – the largest group of out LGBTQ council members ever elected in a city.

• Rebecca Maurer, a Democrat, defeated a 16-year incumbent and became the first out LGBTQ woman elected to the Cleveland City Council.

• Gabriela Santiago-Romero, also a Democrat, became the first LGBTQ councilwoman in Detroit AND the first Latinx out LGBTQ woman elected in the state of Michigan.

• Dion Manley became the first trans person elected in the state of Ohio after winning his race for the Gahanna-Jefferson school board.

• Democratic candidate Christopher Coburn became the first Black out LGBTQ person ever elected in Montana after winning his race for Bozeman City Commission.

 

• Xander Orenstein is the first nonbinary person elected to a judicial position in the United States after winning their race for the Allegheny County Magisterial District Court in Pennsylvania.

• Thu Nguyen, a Democrat, became the first nonbinary person elected in the state of Massachusetts after winning their race for Worcester City Council.

• Don Guardian became the first out LGBTQ Republican state lawmaker in New Jersey when he won his election to the General Assembly. Until his swearing in, New Jersey remains one of just six states in the entire country without any LGBTQ state lawmakers.

Winning reelection on Tuesday were Danica Roem, a member of the Virginia House of Delegates, and Andrea Jenkins, of the Minneapolis City Council.

Roem made history in 2017 when she was elected the first out transgender person to serve in a state legislature. And Jenkins, in 2017, became the first Black trans woman elected to public office.