That Time When Gamers Discovered The Other ‘Manhunt’

Screen capture of Manhunt homepage
Screen capture of Manhunt homepage
Screen capture of Manhunt homepage

Gamers and gays found themselves at a Twitter intersection this afternoon when “Manhunt” began trending and folks got way excited.

As gays know, Manhunt is the OG gay dating network founded back in 2001. Before we had smart phones and apps to swipe left on like Scruff and Grindr, Manhunt was the online destination of choice for guys looking for a “date.”

The Twitter account for Manhunt even jokes in its bio about the company’s longevity writing, “Yes, we’re still here.”

But on the other side of the social spectrum, “Manhunt” means a whole different thing to gamers.

Part of the Minecraft series, ‘Minecraft Manhunt’ was created by a Minecraft YouTuber named Dream.

The Urban Dictionary files this description: “The basic idea of Minecraft Manhunt is that Dream is trying to beat the Ender Dragon while his friend/s try to stop him, and they have a compass they can use to track him down.”

Not being a gamer, I’m not really sharp on what that means, but it’s apparently really popular.

Manhunt was also a horror-based video game launched in the 2000s. Gamers chatting on the idea of a reboot is apparently what actually got the word trending on Twitter.

BUT – when the term “Manhunt” began trending, true-blue gamer hearts began to flutter…until they discovered the ‘other’ Manhunt.


https://twitter.com/emilyto11232679/status/1374763789971783680

Grindr Unwrapped: Countries With Most Tops, Bottoms, And More

(image via Depositphotos)

As the year 2020 is (finally) coming to a close, it seems everyone is doing year-end wrap-ups and lists. So, why not Grindr?

The popular gay dating app took a deep dive into some statistics regarding its worldwide audience of users.

In a series of posts titled ‘Grindr Unwrapped,’ inspired by Spotify’s annual Spotify Wrapped, the folks in the know took a look at sex and dating trends among the nearly 13 million gay, bi, trans and queer app users.

For instance, pointing out that the guys on Grindr “ran the gamut of positions,” the number crunchers note that the countries with the highest percentage of self-proclaimed tops were Morocco, India, Nigeria, Chile, and Israel.

(graphics via Grindr Blog)

Flipping that script, it seems the highest percentage of bottoms can be found in Vietnam, Sweden, Thailand, Peru, and South Africa.

And yes, vers guys do exist especially if you happen to be in Venezuela, Guatemala, Argentina, Mexico, and Australia.

The cities with the most guys getting their Grindr on (per capita) are Washington, D.C., Paris, Bogota, Santiago, and Houston.

Overall, as folks look to getting back in the swing of traveling, it might be useful to know that the countries with the most Grindr users are the U.S., Brazil, Mexico, India, and the U.K.

All in all, there were 7.85 billion taps sent out into the interwebs from our phones with 584 million getting marked as ‘favorites.’

It turns out that Sunday evenings are when folks are most likely to fire up the app, and the eggplant emoji (no surprise) was the top profile emoji.

Grindr does offer a caveat to this list by noting that not all app users include all of these categories of info in their profiles. Plus, keep in mind Grindr itself is its own subset of the gay/bi/trans community.

So, if you find yourself in Morocco or India and the number of top guys don’t seem to add up in your travels, don’t blame Grindr.

Click over to the Grindr blog for more stats from the informal report like top profile songs and where users like to play host the most.

 

 

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A post shared by Grindr (@grindr)

Funny: ‘Match Made In Hell’

Ok, this was quite clever.

Ryan Reynolds’s new ad for the dating app Match featuring Taylor Swift’s song ‘Love Story.’

Reynolds calls it “a Love Story for the ages. Or at least this age.”

Satan: Two zero two zero?
2020: Please, just call me 2020… So, where are you from?
Satan: Hell…
2020: Me too.

Grindr Deletes Ethnicity Filter, Stands With #BlackLivesMatter

Grindr has released its year-end 'Unwrapped' report of stats including countries with most tops, most bottoms and more.

In response to the ongoing protests across the country in the aftermath of the death of George Floyd, a Minneapolis man who died face down on the ground, handcuffed with a knee on his neck for several minutes, the gay dating app Grindr says “We will not be silent.”

In posts to the company’s social media accounts, Grindr has announced the ethnicity filter on its app is history. Gone.⁣

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We will not be silent. Black lives matter. ⁣ ⁣ We were planning to announce our #PridePerseveres initiative today, but in light of the ongoing violence and injustices against our POC family, that no longer feels appropriate. How can we launch a month of celebration when so many of us are hurting? How can we celebrate Pride without acknowledging that we wouldn’t even HAVE a Pride month if it weren’t for the brave black, brown, trans, and queer folks whose uprising against the police at Stonewall gave birth to the modern LGBTQ+ rights movement? It is our responsibility to speak out against the hate and violence that such a vital part of our community continue to face.⁣ ⁣ We stand in solidarity with the #BlackLivesMatter movement and the hundreds of thousands of queer people of color who log in to our app every day. We will not be silent, and we will not be inactive. Today we are making donations to the Marsha P. Johnson Institute @mpjinstitute and Black Lives Matter @blklivesmatter, and urge you to do the same if you can (links in bio). We will continue to fight racism on Grindr, both through dialogue with our community and a zero-tolerance policy for racism and hate speech on our platform. As part of this commitment, and based on your feedback, we have decided to remove the ethnicity filter from our next release.⁣ ⁣ Tomorrow, we will announce our #PridePerseveres calendar, but in a different light. Yes, we can still come together in the spirit of Pride, but Pride this year has an added responsibility, a shifted tone, and a new priority that will be reflected in our programming—support and solidarity for queer people of color and the #BlackLivesMatter movement.

A post shared by Grindr (@grindr) on

“We were planning to announce our #PridePerseveres initiative today, but in light of the ongoing violence and injustices against our POC family, that no longer feels appropriate,” begins the statement on Instagram. “How can we launch a month of celebration when so many of us are hurting?”

“How can we celebrate Pride without acknowledging that we wouldn’t even HAVE a Pride month if it weren’t for the brave black, brown, trans, and queer folks whose uprising against the police at Stonewall gave birth to the modern LGBTQ+ rights movement?”

Announcing the company stands “in solidarity with the #BlackLivesMatter movement and the hundreds of thousands of queer people of color who log in to our app every day,” the dating app says it will not be silent nor be inactive. “Today we are making donations to the Marsha P. Johnson Institute and Black Lives Matter, and urge you to do the same if you can.”

“We will continue to fight racism on Grindr, both through dialogue with our community and zero-tolerance policy for racism and hate speech on our platform,” the statement continues. “As part of this commitment, and based on your feedback, we have decided to remove the ethnicity filter from our next release.”

Grindr goes on to mention their previously announced #PridePerseveres calendar, a series of Pride events taking place each day of June, will go on but “in a different light.”

Noting that Pride this year “has an added responsibility, a shifted tone, and a new priority,” the programming for the series will be amended to show “support and solidarity for queer people of color and the #BlackLivesMatter movement.”

Grindr Adds New Features For Increased User Safety

Grindr has released its year-end 'Unwrapped' report of stats including countries with most tops, most bottoms and more.

Popular gay dating app Grindr has announced new safety/security features to help protect users from identity theft and danger in locations where being gay is a crime.

The new features include:

• Being able to ‘unsend’ messages and photos from conversations with other users

• ‘Expiring photos’ which will allow users to have their photos disappear from conversations

• Screenshot blocking to protect content and photos of those in countries or locations unfriendly to LGBTQ people

Grindr has also unveiled a “Holistic Security Guide.”

The guide, released in six languages, provides advice for digital security, personal safety and emotional well-being while engaging others online.

“We are so proud to introduce these new security features, along with the Holistic Security Guide, as we continue to promote safety and justice for our users around the globe,” said Jack Harrison-Quintana, the director of Grindr for Equality. “We are grateful for the feedback from users and the various organizations and activists around the world who have helped us to continue improving the quality of life for Grindr users.”

The company says the new features are part of Grindr’s continuing efforts to encourage more awareness of personal safety after reports of crimes being committed against queer people using the app.

The U.S. Justice Department announced today, for example, that two men in Dallas have pleaded guilty to using the dating app to lure unsuspecting gay men to a vacant apartment in order to rob them, force them at gunpoint to withdraw cash from ATMs, commit violent acts and other hate crimes.

Scruff Bans Bikini Swimsuits & “Sexually Suggestive Embraces” From Profile Photos

Earlier this week, users of the popular gay dating app Scruff were greeted by a message from the company of a change in policy regarding profile pictures.

Titled, “Profile photo guidelines are changing,” the alert went on to state, “To comply with platform policies, photos in underwear, jockstraps or bikini style bathing suits are no longer permitted in profile photos.”

In a statement on the site’s support page, Scuff CEO Eric Silverberg wrote, “All gay and queer apps must enforce app store content policies or risk being removed from the app stores altogether, and this happened to SCRUFF earlier this year.”

“Had this removal been permanent, it would have been devastating to our company and our community,” he added.

Silverberg didn’t elaborate which App Store had temporarily removed his app.

“The primary profile photo may not show jockstraps, underwear, or bikini-style swimwear,” explained the CEO.

Also, profile photos that show “sexually suggestive embraces” might not “align with App Store guidelines.”

Additional guidelines include:

• No exposed genitals (not even a small, tiny part)

• No visible erections or visible outline of genitalia in clothes.

• No shower shots

• No shots of genitalia obscured by towels or hands

• No cropping of shots to make the crotch focal point of the photo

• No collages or compositions of multiple photos

The complete list of no-no’s regarding profile photos is posted here.

“Given that Scruff is a community that speaks openly and positively about sex, bodies, and intimacy, some feel that such policies are at odds with those values,” wrote Silverberg in closing. “Such criticism is not unfounded,”

“Scruff respects the concerns voiced by our community on this matter, and we encourage everyone to continue to hold us, and all tech companies, accountable for the content and conduct standards we enforce,” he added.

The CEO told Out that all profile photos will be “graded on a case-by-case basis.” He also noted that the app doesn’t require a public profile photo.

Scruff had apparently received a warning earlier this month by distributors of their app with a warning on the subject following the recent ban of adult content on Tumblr.

Here’s an example (pulled from Scruff’s own Instagram account) of what is NOT allowed as a profile photo now:

Gay Dating Apps Weigh In On Grindr CEO’s Marriage Equality Debacle

Last week, the blog INTO, which is owned by Grindr, wrote that Chen had shared an article on his Facebook regarding Cher Wang, the CEO of HTC, who apparently supported anti-LGBTQ organizations in the recent public referendum on same-sex marriage in Taiwan.

Responding to commenters on the post, Chen apparently wrote, in part, “There are people who believe that marriage is a holy matrimony between a man and a woman.”

Many folks took his comment that “marriage is a holy matrimony between a man and a woman” as being anti-marriage equality.

INTO updated its report when Chen later issued a statement saying, in part, “The words I chose related to marriage between a man and a woman were meant to express my personal feelings about my own marriage to my wife – not to suggest that I am opposed to marriage equality.”

He went on to say that he has long considered himself “an advocate for LGBTQ+ rights.”

“ I support gay marriage and I am proud that I can work for Grindr,” he added. “I apologize that my words did not clearly convey these feelings.”

Now, other gay dating app companies are chiming in on the subject.

CEO and co-founder of SCRUFF, Eric Silverberg, posted a video message expressing his concern that comments from the leaders of gay-centric businesses can have the power to set LGBTQ progress back in terms of equal rights and representation.

He began his message by stating up front that he is “unequivocally in favor of gay marriage.”

“When leaders in the gay community say these things, they disrespect the decades long work of marriage equality activists and give credibility to far-right politicians who are trying to roll back these rights.”

Silverberg also urged tech leaders to understand and further the moral agenda of the communities they serve.

“Let’s move our swipes and ‘likes’ to online communities led by people who stand behind their beliefs and actions, and who have a moral intuition that reflects our community,” he said in closing.

And dating app Jack’d posted a short video response via Instagram which shows Grindr’s recently announced ‘Kindr’ campaign, but it’s quickly overwhelmed by screen shots of the Chen/Grindr story.

Jack’d ends the message with the words “Love is Love.” Watch below.

A post shared by Jack’d (@jackdapp) on Nov 30, 2018 at 12:22pm PST

Music Video: Christopher Sorensen “Afterglow”

The new music video from Christopher Sorensen, “Afterglow,” explores the dynamic between an 18-year-old teen and an older man who connect through a gay dating app.

The video chronicles the first meeting of the pair at the older man’s home, complete with cocktails and a swim in his pool.

Things do go the way of romance and there are follow-up encounters.

But when one night goes late, there are fireworks at home after what looks like a missed curfew.

As his parents argue, the young man erupts in anger and goes looking for his older paramour, only to find a surprise.

Sorensen’s reps told Towleroad that the storyline is “very personal to Christopher.”

“His goal is to create a safe space for young gay men to talk about any experience where they have felt taken advantage of,” the statement continued.

“Afterglow” is the first time Sorensen has included his own LGBT identity in his music. His 2015 music video, “Balloon,” addressed bullying.

Any readers have a similar experience with dating apps? Let us know in the comments.

Watch the video below.

(h/t Towleroad)

Video: Dating While Asian

Model Kevin Kreider shares his experience of discrimination on dating apps because he's Asian

An actor and friend of mine shared this video on Facebook and it really struck me.

First of al,l because my friend and the man in the video, model Kevin Kreider, are both really good looking.

Kreider is straight, my friend is gay, but both encountered the same bias and discrimination in online dating – “No Asians.”

And this isn’t new. From early dating websites to hook up apps today, gay and straight, this is something folks see all the time.

No Asians. No Blacks. No fats. No femmes.

That’s what folks put in their online profiles.

Now, some might say, “Well, that’s their preference.”

But look at what you’re missing out on by putting that out there, up front. You’re missing a great guy whose hot like Kevin Kreider.

It’s important to note, as well, the sinister, negative effects these messages have over time on people.

“I remember growing up wanting to be white. I didn’t want to be Asian. But after all this, I realized I didn’t actually want to be white, I wanted to be treated like I was white.”

Imagine the toll that would take on your psyche over a lifetime.

As Kreider says, he began to abuse alcohol and drugs to cope with slow-growing depression over being constantly dismissed.

It’s a short video, but definitely worth a watch.